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List of products that may contain salmonella

Posted: 7:53 AM, Jul 27, 2018
Updated: 2018-07-27 16:09:28-04

There is a growing list of food that the CDC says may be contaminated with salmonella. Here is a list of products currently being investigated, according to the CDC. Scroll down to find a list of recalled products from the FDA.

Raw Turkey Products- Salmonella Infections

  • Ninety people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Reading have been reported from 26 states.
  • Forty people have been hospitalized, and no deaths have been reported.
  • Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that raw turkey products from a variety of sources are contaminated with Salmonella Reading and are making people sick.
  • In interviews, ill people report eating different types and brands of turkey products purchased from many different locations. Two ill people lived in a household where raw turkey pet food was fed to pets.
  • The outbreak strain has been identified in samples taken from raw turkey pet food, raw turkey products, and live turkeys.
  • A single, common supplier of raw turkey products or of live turkeys has not been identified.
  • The outbreak strain of Salmonella Reading is present in live turkeys and in many types of raw turkey products, indicating it might be widespread in the turkey industry. CDC and USDA-FSIS have shared this information with representatives from the turkey industry and asked about steps that they may be taking to reduce Salmonella contamination.

Hy-vee Spring Pasta Salad- Salmonella Sandiego

  • On July 17, 2018, Hy-Vee, Inc. recalled its Spring Pasta Salad because it might be contaminated with Salmonella.
  • Do not eat recalled Hy-Vee Spring Pasta Salad.
  • The Spring Pasta Salad includes shell pasta, carrots, celery, cucumbers, green pepper, onion, and mayonnaise.
  • The recalled pasta salad was sold in 1-pound (16 oz.) and 3-pound (48 oz.) plastic containers or may have been scooped at the deli counter into clear plastic containers.
  • The recalled pasta salad was sold in all Hy-Vee grocery stores in Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.
  • The expiration dates for the recalled pasta salad range from June 22, 2018 to August 3, 2018.
  • Return the recalled Spring Pasta Salad to the store for a refund or throw it away. Even if some of it was eaten and no one got sick, do not eat it.
  • If you stored recalled pasta salad in another container, throw the pasta salad away. Thoroughly wash the container with warm, soapy water before using it again, to remove harmful germs that could contaminate other food.
  • Contact a healthcare provider if you think you got sick from eating recalled Hy-Vee Spring Pasta Salad.
  • Restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell recalled Hy-Vee Spring Pasta Salad.

Kellogg’s Honey Smacks Cereal- Salmonella Mbandaka

  • Do not eat any Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal, regardless of package size or best-by date. Check your home for it and throw it away, or return it to the place of purchase for a refund. The Kellogg Company recalled the cereal on June 14, 2018.
  • Retailers should not sell or serve Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal.
  • Even if some of the cereal has been eaten and no one got sick, throw the rest of it away or return it for a refund.
  • If you store cereal that looks like Kellogg’s Honey Smacks in a container without the packaging and don’t remember the brand or type, throw it away.
  • Thoroughly wash the container with warm, soapy water before using it again, to remove harmful germs that could contaminate other food.

Investigation details:

  • CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Mbandaka infections.
  • 100 people infected with the outbreak strain have been reported from 33 states.
  • 30 people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.
  • Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal is the likely source of this multistate outbreak.
  • This investigation is ongoing and CDC will provide updates when more information is available.

Pre-Cut Melon – Salmonella Adelaide

  • As of July 26, 2018, this outbreak appears to be over.
  • CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration investigated an outbreak of Salmonella Adelaide infections.
  • Seventy-seven people infected with the outbreak strain were reported from nine states.
  • Thirty-six people were hospitalized. No deaths were reported.
  • Epidemiologic and traceback evidence indicated that pre-cut melon supplied by Caito Foods, LLC of Indianapolis, Indiana was the likely source of this multistate outbreak.
  • Most of the ill people reported eating pre-cut cantaloupe, watermelon, or a fruit salad mix with melon purchased from grocery stores.
  • Information collected from stores where ill people shopped indicates that Caito Foods, LLC supplied pre-cut melon to these stores.
  • Consumers, restaurants, and retailers that had recalled pre-cut melon should take these steps to make sure harmful germs from recalled fruit don’t contaminate other foods:
  • Consumers should wash and sanitize drawers and shelves in refrigerators and freezers where recalled pre-cut melon was stored.
  • Retailers should wash and sanitize bins or containers where recalled pre-cut melon was stored.
  • In the United States, nearly half of foodborne illnesses are caused by germs on fresh fruits and vegetables. CDC recommends that consumers, restaurants, and retailers always choose and handle fruits safely to help prevent foodborne illness.

Shell Eggs

  • As of June 14, 2018, this outbreak appears to be over.
  • CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) investigated a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Braenderup infections linked to Rose Acre Farms shell eggs.
  • Forty-five people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Braenderup were reported from 10 states.
  • Eleven people were hospitalized, and no deaths were reported.
  • Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence indicated that shell eggs produced by Rose Acre Farms’ Hyde County, North Carolina farm were the likely source of this multistate outbreak.
  • On April 13, 2018, Rose Acre Farms of Seymour, Indiana, voluntarily recalled 206,749,248 shell eggs because they could have been contaminated with Salmonella bacteria. Visit the FDA website for a list of recalled products.
  • On April 16, 2018, Cal-Maine Foods, Inc. voluntarily recalled 23,400 dozen eggs purchased from Rose Acre Farms.
    Consumers and restaurants should handle and cook eggs safely to avoid foodborne illness from raw eggs. It is important to handle and prepare all fresh eggs and egg products carefully.
  • Eggs should be cooked until both the yolk and white are firm. Scrambled eggs should not be runny.
  • Wash hands and items that came into contact with raw eggs-including countertops, utensils, dishes, and cutting boards-with soap and water.
  • Wash and sanitize drawers or shelves in refrigerators where recalled eggs were stored.

Dried Coconut – Salmonella Typhimurium

  • As of May 18, 2018, this outbreak appears to be over.
  • Do not eat recalled dried coconut products. Retailers should not sell or serve recalled dried coconut products.
  • These products have a long shelf life and may still be in people’s homes.
  • Throw it away or return it to the place of purchase for a refund.
  • Several grocery store and retail locations received recalled bulk packages of International Harvest, Inc. brand Go Smiles Dried Coconut Raw.
  • The recalled bulk dried coconut may have been repackaged into clear, plastic containers with grocery store labeling, or served in bulk bins.
  • The list of locations and cities where recalled bulk dried coconut was sold is available on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website.
  • If you aren’t sure if your dried coconut was recalled, do not eat it and throw it away.
  • CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the FDA investigated a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium infections.
  • Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence indicated that dried coconut was the likely source of this multistate outbreak.
  • Fourteen people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Typhimurium were reported from eight states and the District of Columbia.
  • Three ill people were hospitalized, and no deaths were reported.

Chicken Salad- Salmonella Typhimurium

  • This outbreak appears to be over.
  • On February 21, 2018, Triple T Specialty Meats, Inc. recalled all chicken salad produced from January 2, 2018 to February 7, 2018. The recalled chicken salad was sold in containers of various weights from the deli at Fareway grocery stores in Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, and South Dakota from January 4, 2018, to February 9, 2018.
  • CDC recommends people do not eat any remaining recalled chicken salad sold at Fareway grocery stores, including any that has been frozen. Throw it away or return it to the place of purchase.
  • Even if some of the chicken salad was eaten or served and no one got sick, throw the rest of it away, including any chicken salad in your freezer. Put it in a sealed bag in the trash so that children, pets or other animals can’t eat it.
  • Wash and sanitize countertops as well as drawers or shelves in refrigerators or freezers where recalled chicken salad was stored.
  • If you don’t remember the date when you purchased chicken salad from Fareway, don’t eat it. Throw it away or return it to the place of purchase.
  • CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service investigated a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium infections.
  • 265 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Typhimurium were reported from 8 states.
  • 94 hospitalizations were reported, including one person from Iowa who died.
  • Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence indicated that chicken salad produced by Triple T Specialty Meats, Inc. and sold at Fareway grocery stores was the likely source of this multistate outbreak.

Kratom- Salmonella I 4,[5],12:b:-

  • As of May 24, 2018, this outbreak investigation is over.
  • People should be aware that kratom could be contaminated with Salmonella and could make people sick.
  • Contaminated products may still be available for purchase because the investigation was not able to identify a single, common source of contaminated kratom.
  • Several companies recalled kratom products because they might be contaminated with Salmonella. The list of recalled kratom products is available on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration website.
  • Kratom is also known as Thang, Kakuam, Thom, Ketom, and Biak.
  • Kratom is a plant consumed for its stimulant effects and as an opioid substitute.
  • CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration investigated this multistate outbreak of Salmonella infections.
  • A total of 199 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella were reported from 41 states.
  • Thirty-eight percent of ill people were hospitalized, and no deaths were reported.
  • This outbreak included infections from several types of Salmonella: Salmonella I 4,[5],12:b:-, Salmonella Heidelberg, Salmonella Javiana, Salmonella Okatie, Salmonella Weltevreden, and Salmonella Thompson.
  • Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicated that kratom was the likely source of this multistate outbreak.

Raw Sprouts- Salmonella Montevideo

  • CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration investigated a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Montevideo infections.
  • Ten people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Montevideo were reported from three states.
  • No hospitalizations and no deaths were reported.
  • Epidemiologic evidence indicated that raw sprouts were the likely source of this multistate outbreak.
  • Ill people in this outbreak reported eating raw sprouts on sandwiches served at Jimmy John’s restaurants in Illinois and Wisconsin.
  • One ill person in this outbreak reported eating raw sprouts purchased from a grocery store in Minnesota.
  • This outbreak appears to be over. Any contaminated sprouts that made people sick in this outbreak would now be older than their recommended shelf life. FDA and state, and local regulatory officials conducted traceback investigations to help determine the source of the sprouts and their distribution chain. To date, no contamination source has been identified.
  • Raw and lightly cooked sprouts are a known source of foodborne illness. CDC recommends that consumers, restaurants, and other retailers always follow food safety practices to avoid illness from eating sprouts.

Frozen Shredded Coconut- Salmonella Montevideo- Salmonella I 4,[5],12:b:- and Salmonella Newport

  • This outbreak appears to be over. However, the recalled shredded coconut has a long shelf life and may still be in people’s homes. Consumers unaware of the recall could continue to eat the product and potentially get sick.
  • CDC recommends that retailers not sell, restaurants not serve, and consumers not eat recalled frozen shredded coconut.
  • The recalled product was packaged in 16-ounce plastic bags labeled as Coconut Tree Brand frozen Shredded Coconut.
  • CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration investigated a multistate outbreak of Salmonella infections.
  • 27 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:b:- or Salmonella Newport were reported from 9 states.
  • Six ill people were hospitalized. No deaths were reported.
  • Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence indicated that Coconut Tree Brand frozen Shredded Coconut, distributed by Evershing International Trading Company, was the likely source of this multistate outbreak.
  • On January 3, 2018, Evershing International Trading Company recalled all 16 oz. Coconut Tree Brand Frozen
  • Shredded Coconut after Salmonella was identified in the product by officials in Massachusetts.
  • If you have recalled frozen shredded coconut in your home, you can return it to the place of purchase for a refund.
  • If you aren’t sure if the frozen coconut you bought is Coconut Tree Brand frozen Shredded Coconut, you can ask the place of purchase. Restaurants and retailers can ask their supplier.
  • When in doubt, don’t eat, sell, or serve it. Throw it out.
  • Wash and sanitize countertops as well as drawers or shelves in freezers or refrigerators where frozen shredded coconut were stored.

SALMONELLA FROM LIVE ANIMALS

Live Poultry in Backyard Flocks

  • Since the last update on June 8, 2018, 88 more ill people have been reported. The most recent illness began on June 21, 2018.
  • CDC and multiple states are investigating several multistate outbreaks of Salmonella infections linked to contact with live poultry in backyard flocks.
  • People can get sick with Salmonella infections from touching live poultry or their environment. These birds can be carrying Salmonella bacteria but appear healthy and clean and show no signs of illness.
  • Several different types of Salmonella bacteria have made people sick in this outbreak: Salmonella Seftenberg,
  • Salmonella Montevideo, Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Indiana, and Salmonella Litchfield.
  • As of July 13, 2018, 212 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella have been reported from 44 states.
    Illnesses started from February 15, 2018 to June 21, 2018.
  • 34 ill people have been hospitalized, and no deaths have been reported.
  • 26% of ill people are children younger than 5 years.
  • Epidemiologic, traceback, and laboratory findings link these outbreaks to contact with live poultry, such as chicks and ducklings, which come from multiple hatcheries.
  • In interviews, 100 (72%) of 138 ill people with information available reported contact with chicks or ducklings in the week before their illness started.
  • People reported obtaining chicks and ducklings from several sources, including feed supply stores, websites, hatcheries, and from relatives.
  • WGS analysis to identify antibiotic resistance was performed for 118 isolates from ill people in this outbreak.
  • Twenty-two isolates from ill people contained genes expected to cause resistance or decreased susceptibility to all or some of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, gentamicin, ceftriaxone, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, ciprofloxacin, and fosfomycin. Ninety-six isolates did not identify predicted resistance. Testing of 5 outbreak isolates using standard antibiotic susceptibility testing by CDC’s
  • National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) laboratory confirmed these results. Some infections may be difficult to treat with commonly recommended antibiotics, and may require another kind of antibiotic.
  • This investigation is ongoing, and CDC will provide updates when more information is available.

Pet Guinea Pigs

  • CDC, several states, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections.
  • CDC began investigating in December 2017 when CDC PulseNet identified a cluster of three Salmonella Enteritidis infections that whole genome sequencing showed were closely related genetically.
  • A review of the PulseNet database identified six more closely related illnesses dating back to 2015. These illnesses were added to the outbreak case count.
  • Nine people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Enteritidis have been reported from eight states.
    Illnesses started on dates ranging from July 17, 2015 to December 15, 2017.
  • One person was hospitalized, and no deaths were reported.
  • Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that contact with pet guinea pigs is the likely source of this multistate outbreak.
  • Four of the seven people interviewed reported contact with a guinea pig or its habitat in the week before getting sick.
  • The outbreak strain of Salmonella was identified in a sample collected from an ill person’s pet guinea pig in Vermont.
  • Whole genome sequencing showed that Salmonella bacteria isolated from sick people and the guinea pig were closely related genetically. This result provides more evidence that people in this outbreak got sick from contact with pet guinea pigs.
  • Whole genome sequencing did not identify predicted antibiotic resistance in 11 of 13 isolates analyzed (9 ill people and 4 guinea pigs). One isolate from a sick person and one isolate from a guinea pig contained genes for resistance to streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Testing of outbreak isolates using standard antibiotic susceptibility testing by CDC’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System laboratory confirmed these results.
  • This outbreak is a reminder that pet rodents such as guinea pigs, regardless of where they are purchased or adopted, can carry Salmonella bacteria even when they look healthy and clean. Follow CDC’s tips to keep you and your pet safe and healthy.
  • Pick the right pet. Pet rodents are not recommended as pets for children younger than 5 years, and should not be kept in childcare centers.
  • Always wash your hands after touching, feeding, or caring for pet rodents or cleaning their habitats.
  • Visit the CDC website for updates on these outbreaks and more. www.cdc.gov

FDA FOOD RECALLS DUE TO SALMONELLA

Dry Whey Powder

Associated Milk Producers Inc. (AMPI) of New Ulm, Minn., is recalling dry whey powder packaged in 50-pound and 25-kg bags that were produced at the cooperative’s Blair, Wis., dry whey plant from May 1-5, 2018; May 24-29, 2018; June 2-5, 2018; and June 7-14, 2018 due to the potential to be contaminated with salmonella. This is a precautionary recall. All products shipped to the marketplace tested negative for salmonella.

Mrs. Freshley’s and Other Brands of Swiss Rolls and Captain John Derst’s Old Fashioned Bread

As a precautionary measure, Flowers Foods, Inc. (NYSE: FLO) is voluntarily recalling Swiss Rolls sold under the brand names Mrs. Freshley’s, Food Lion, H-E-B, Baker’s Treat, Market Square, and Great Value, distributed nationwide, and Captain John Derst’s Old Fashioned Bread distributed in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina, due to the potential presence of Salmonella in an ingredient, whey powder. The ingredient recall was initiated by a third-party whey powder manufacturer and supplier. No illnesses have been reported in connection with the recalled items. See below for list of UPC #s and “best by” dates.

BRAND UPC # BEST BY / ENJOY BY DATES
Mrs. Freshley’s – 4 ct./7.2 oz. 072250011907 10/09/18 through 10/19/18 309 8187 A 75 D
309 8187 B 75 D
309 8190 C 75 D
309 8194 B 75 D
309 8194 C 75 D
Mrs. Freshley’s – 6 ct./12 oz. 072250903233 10/14/18
309 8194 B 75 D
Food Lion – 6 ct./13 oz. 035826092779 10/16/18
H-E-B – 6 ct./12 oz. 041220296583 09/19/18
Baker’s Treat – 6 ct./13 oz. 041498188382 09/21/18 through 09/28/18
Market Square – 6 ct./12 oz. 087381760556 309 8194 B
Great Value – 6 ct./13 oz. 078742147550 Sep 17 2018 Through Sep 25 2018
309 8191 B
Captain John Derst’s
Old Fashioned Bread
071316001180 07/16/18 through 7/28/18

 

Pepperidge Farm® Announces Voluntary Recall of Four Varieties of Goldfish® Crackers

Pepperidge Farm has been notified by one of its ingredient suppliers that whey powder in a seasoning that is applied to four varieties of crackers has been the subject of a recall by the whey powder manufacturer due to the potential presence of Salmonella. Pepperidge Farm initiated an investigation and, out of an abundance of caution, is voluntarily recalling four varieties of Goldfish crackers. The products were distributed throughout the United States. No illnesses have been reported. No other Pepperidge Farm products in the U.S. are subject to this recall.

The following four varieties are subject to this recall:

  • Flavor  Blasted ® Xtra Cheddar
  • FlavorBlasted ® Sour Cream & Onion
  • Goldfish ® Baked with Whole Grain Xtra Cheddar
  • Goldfish ® Mix Xtra Cheddar + Pretzel

Certain Ritz Cracker Sandwiches and Ritz Bits Product in the U.S., including Puerto Rico & U.S. Virgin Islands

Mondelez Global LLC announced today a voluntary recall in the United States, including Puerto Rico & the U.S. Virgin Islands, of certain Ritz Cracker Sandwiches and Ritz Bits product. These products contain whey powder as an ingredient, which the whey powder supplier has recalled due to the potential presence of Salmonella.