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Tutors help parents with kids' learning needs during pandemic

Companies offer affordable live tutoring options for remote learning
Posted at 4:23 PM, Aug 31, 2020
and last updated 2020-09-01 03:25:23-04

CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas — As some parents juggle working from home, taking care of their children and making sure they are successfully adjusting to learning during the COVID-19 pandemic, stress levels can rise.

And for both students and parents, tutoring is going to play an integral role in their success.

Tutoring companies are seeing an increase in demand during the novel coronavirus pandemic.

"We saw an uptick of people basically calling to get a private tutor to assist their kids," said Frog Tutoring CEO Roland Omene.

Frog Tutoring is just one of many tutoring services available in the Coastal Bend. It used to be a predominantly face-to-face service, but have adapted to the recent need for online services.

"We are doing about 98 percent online tutoring," Omene said.

For students, they are able to get tutoring from staff with advanced knowledge, and the online aspect allows tutors from anywhere in country to help.

"We can find your son or daughter the best calculus tutor available and that person might be from New York," he said.

For parents, online tutoring allows them an extra hand, and for those who are out of work at the moment and looking to make some extra money, tutoring is a great way to make ends meet.

Ally Sharpe is a tutor in Corpus Christi. She has held other jobs before, but she finds herself always going back to tutoring.

"I have had some regular-type jobs before, but I find myself tutoring because it is so rewarding," she said.

Those interested in working for Frog Tutoring must meet certain GPA requirements in a certain subject and go through an in-depth interview process.

The company prides itself on hiring not only knowledgeable people, but those with personalities suited to teaching and helping. Tutors have to have the right mentality, according to Sharpe.

"You've got to be patient and really lenient," Sharpe said. "You also have to be compassionate, and once you do that they mold in your hands."