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Corpus Christi Museum of Science and History closed for repairs - KRISTV.com | Continuous News Coverage | Corpus Christi

Corpus Christi Museum of Science and History closed for repairs months after Harvey

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The Museum of Science and History has been closed for nearly five months due to Harvey damage and other problems with the decades old building. The Museum of Science and History has been closed for nearly five months due to Harvey damage and other problems with the decades old building.
Contractors are fixing damaged floors, a damaged roof, and leaks. Contractors are fixing damaged floors, a damaged roof, and leaks.
Mold remediation is in progress and city officials say more mold was found in the building this week. Mold remediation is in progress and city officials say more mold was found in the building this week.
CORPUS CHRISTI -

Decades of use have taken their toll on the Corpus Christi Museum of Science and History, but Hurricane Harvey finally forced it to shut down for repairs.

It is one of the city's most popular tourist draws, and it is also an educational resource for area schools. However, the museum has been closed to the public for nearly five months now for mold remediation. 

Bill Durrill, President of CCMJV, the private company that manages the city-owned building, tells KRIS 6 they are working to open the museum's doors as quickly as possible. 

The goal, was to open the museum for spring break, but city officials say just this week more mold was found inside the museum.

The Corpus Christi Museum of Science and History took a beating from Hurricane Harvey: floor damage, roof damage, leaks, and mold. 

"We had water penetrate through the front doors. And you can see the laminate bubbling up from the water damage," Durrill said. 

Damage caused the museum to close briefly after Harvey. Then it opened its doors again for about a month, hosting one major event during that time, the Classic Brew. 

However, contractors hired by the city discovered more and more problems in sections of the museum, which were built between the 1950s and 1970s. 

It closed again on October 13th, and it has not reopened since then. 

"It was something that it was kind of a can of worms, where you started one area and you see another area, and you see another area. And you have to keep going until it's all done," Durrill said. 

Since October, signs on the front doors have shown visitors that mold remediation is in progress. 

"It's a very intense process because we're having to go through all the artifacts. Our staff is having to clean each one. And I mean we're talking thousands of pieces," Durrill said. 

None of the museums artifacts were damaged. 

Now a a bare bones staff is maintaining the building, working in areas where the air quality has been tested. 

"They've been in the safe environments, in the areas that have not been contaminated," Durrill said. 

Although the museum hosts events, holds summer camps for local kids, and is a tourist attraction, Durrill says it will not open up to the public again until the city, contractors, and management all agree it is completely safe. 

"The whole goal is to get it back open so that the public can enjoy their asset that they've got here, and we're just trying to make sure that we take the proper steps, that everything is being done correctly," he said. 

Durrill adds that despite the damages and the building's old age, it would not be cost effective to build a completely new museum. Especially when the city is investing in so much money in repairs. 

The city has authorized hundreds of thousands of dollars for the restoration. 

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